New York, NY – September 9, 2014: The League of Professional Theatre Women (LPTW), as part of an initiative called Women Count, are pleased to present an analysis of women employed Off-Broadway in the four most recent theatrical seasons. A number of efforts  to count, study, analyze and report on the status of women in theatre, in recent years, have focused on playwrights and directors.  This new study looks at a broader range of professional roles with a specific focus on Off-Broadway productions.

The study, conducted by LPTW members and professional theatre women Judith Binus and Martha Wade Steketee, analyzes employment in 13 professional roles (including playwrights, directors, and designers) and provides an explicit focus on 355 Off-Broadway productions in 22 theatre companies for four complete seasons, 2010-2011 through 2013-2014. Women Count, part of the LPTW’s Advocacy Committee, is charged with continuing to count women working in American theater in upcoming seasons.

Binus explains, “This report doesn’t just list numbers. This report names women who have been working frequently during the study’s four seasons.”


  • Women playwrights working Off-Broadway ranged from a high of 36% in 2012-2013, to a low of 28% in 2013-2014. Women directors Off-Broadway ranged from a high of 39% in 2012-2013 to a low of 24% in 2011-2012.
  • Off-Broadway set designers studied are about one-third female, ranging from 27% in 2010-2011 to a high of 36% in 2012-2013. Thirteen female set designers with three or more productions are represented in the report period, accounting for 73% (82 of 112) of set design credits.
  • Off-Broadway sound designers range from a high of 22% female in 2011-2012  to a low of 14% female in 2013-2014. Three female sound designers account for 85% (57 of 67) of sound design credits for women during the study report’s 4 seasons. Almost 50% of sound design credits during the study period are by Jill BC Du Boff.
  • National rates of female stage managers average 70%. Off-Broadway rates in the study’s 22 theatres for the past four seasons approximate that rate for Production Stage Managers and exceed that rate for Stage Managers and Assistant Stage Managers.
  • For the four seasons of the study, the number of musicals was small, affecting the numbers and percentages of women employed in musical-related categories, including lyricists and composers.

Click to view the full report:

LPTW Women Hired Off-Broadway [August 2014] [2014-8-6]


The report has been picked up by theatre press outlets! Click the links below to read articles in Broadway World, American Theatre, and the Clyde Fitch Report:

Broadway World

American Theatre

Clyde Fitch Report